Ground Support Worldwide

OCT 2012

The ground support industry's source for news, articles, events, product and services information.

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RAMP SAFETY How To Change A 'Culture Of Noncompliance' This kind of change requires personal action and a commitment to safety. By Katrina Bedell Avers, Ph.D., Research Scientist, FAA T he temptation to compare ourselves to others and use someone else's behavior as an excuse doesn't end with childhood. We have likely all been guilty of ask- ing the question, "Why do I have to? Nobody else is doing it that way." We are all too willing to blame our actions (or inactions) on the culture of our organization … our management … overly restrictive regulations … and the list could go on. Organizational norms are powerful, but the bottom line is: Change begins with me! In the aviation industry, inadequate technical documentation or failure to follow procedures accounts for a large number of safety violations. To truly fix the problem, the culture must be changed. A "culture of noncompliance" contrib- utes to issues in technical documenta- tion and following procedures. Although a number of efforts should be taken to change such a culture, two interven- tions should be made priorities: r First, initiate an industry mandate requiring users to address known documentation issues – at all levels of the organization. r Second, expand incident investiga- tions to identify details associated with documentation issues. Changing a culture requires a collec- tive effort at all levels of the organiza- tion and typically begins with senior leadership commitment. Change, how- ever, does not end with senior leader- ship. As aviation professionals, each of us has a responsibility to lead change through our own actions. ADDRESS KNOWN ISSUES Requests from users for manual revi- sions are often lumped with other com- pany requests and not addressed in a timely manner. Even when addressed quickly, the users may not be informed. When users do not see timely results from manual revision requests, they frequently give up and create "work- arounds" to complete tasks, ignoring deficiencies in the manuals until a problem occurs. The operators and Five Challenges To Getting Things Done Right A government and industry workshop met earlier this year to untangle the web of technical information and regulations and make it easier to follow procedures. (See "Procedures 101," April 2012, Ground Support Worldwide.") At the end of the two-day summit, the attend- ees identified five challenges to getting things done right: r Consistent technical documentation. (See "How To Play By The Same Rules," June/July 2012, Ground Support Worldwide.) r Accurate content for users. (See "Give Me The Right Instructions - Please!" September 2012, Ground Support Worldwide.) r Industry culture and professionalism. Changing a culture requires a collective effort at all levels of the organization. As aviation professionals, each of us has a responsibility to lead change through our own actions. r Business case for documentation improvement. r Industry standards. AviationPros.com 19 FAA

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